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  • Tourism in Malaysia

    A Celebration of Diverse Cultures & Traditions

    Discover the Unique, Warm & Vibrant Malaysian Hospitality

Selangor Darul Ehsan

A holiday in Selangor promises endless fun, entertainment and adventure. As one of Malaysia’s most prosperous and developed states, Selangor is also known as the 'gateway to Malaysia' because the main entry points are situated within the state. Its flourishing urban centres such as Petaling Jaya, Subang Jaya, Sunway and Klang abound with modern facilities, from excellent healthcare institutions, international colleges to huge shopping malls and recreational centres. Experience the broad spectrum of attractions - marvel at the glow of fireflies, watch intriguing festivals, have a terrific time at the theme parks, go on a shopping spree or enjoy the sights and sounds of nature.

Attractions

Sultan Abdul Aziz Royal Gallery, Klang

Built in honour of the late Sultan of Selangor, Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah, the Sultan Abdul Aziz Royal Gallery provides an insight into the life of Malaysia's eleventh King. Exhibits include a collection of royal artefacts, gifts, and replicas of the state's crown jewels.

Firefly Parks, Kuala Selangor

Kampung Kuantan and Kampung Bukit Belimbing in Kuala Selangor are some of the few places in the world where one can watch a symphony of lights performed by colonies of firefly at night, lighting up both sides of the river. The light emitted by fireflies is called 'cold light', which produces zero heat. It is used as a means of communication as well as to attract mates.

FRIM (Forest Research Institute of Malaysia), Kepong

FRIM's (Forest Research Institute of Malaysia) lush nature reserve contains more than 15,000 plant species. Reputedly the world's largest man made forest, this forest reserve was declared as a National Heritage Site in 2010. A 30m-high canopy walkway offers sprawling views of the forest and its surroundings. FRIM is one of the few places in the world where one can witness a rare natural phenomenon called 'Crown Shyness', where tree crowns `shy away’ from each other.